Life at Exascale

The fastest supercomputers in the world today solve problems at the petascale—that is a quadrillion (1015) calculations each second.

While these petascale systems are quite powerful, the next milestone in computing achievement is the exascale—a higher level of performance in computing that will have profound impacts on everyday life.

At a quintillion (1018) calculations each second, exascale supercomputers will more realistically simulate the processes involved in precision medicine, regional climate, additive manufacturing, the conversion of plants to biofuels, the relationship between energy and water use, the unseen physics in materials discovery and design, the fundamental forces of the universe, and much more.

Exascale: the Engine of Discovery

Exascale computing will have a profound impact on everyday life in the coming decades. At 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 operations per second, exascale supercomputers will be able to quickly analyze massive volumes of data and more realistically simulate the complex processes and relationships behind many of the fundamental forces of the universe.

This will have practical applications in everything from precision medicine to regional climate, water use to materials science, nuclear physics to national security. Exascale computing has the potential to drive discoveries across the spectrum of scientific fields—and to improve both our understanding of the world and how we live in it.

Learn more about the promise of Exascale and the collaborative efforts of government, academia and industry to lead the way into this new era of computing.

Latest News and Information

CANDLE will Advance Cancer Research and Other Areas as Well

An article on the US Department of Energy website takes a look at the CANcer Distributed Learning Environment, or CANDLE.

From HPCwire: Cray Wins NNSA–Livermore 'El Capitan' Exascale Contract

Cray will build El Capitan, the first exascale supercomputer for the National Nuclear Security Administration and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

ECP’s ExaStar Project Seeks Answers Hidden in the Cosmos

The ExaStar project aims to create simulations for comparison with experiments and observations to help answer a variety of questions.

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