Life at Exascale

The fastest supercomputers in the world today solve problems at the petascale—that is a quadrillion (1015) calculations each second.

While these petascale systems are quite powerful, the next milestone in computing achievement is the exascale—a higher level of performance in computing that will have profound impacts on everyday life.

At a quintillion (1018) calculations each second, exascale supercomputers will more realistically simulate the processes involved in precision medicine, regional climate, additive manufacturing, the conversion of plants to biofuels, the relationship between energy and water use, the unseen physics in materials discovery and design, the fundamental forces of the universe, and much more.

Exascale: the Engine of Discovery

Exascale computing will have a profound impact on everyday life in the coming decades. At 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 operations per second, exascale supercomputers will be able to quickly analyze massive volumes of data and more realistically simulate the complex processes and relationships behind many of the fundamental forces of the universe.

This will have practical applications in everything from precision medicine to regional climate, water use to materials science, nuclear physics to national security. Exascale computing has the potential to drive discoveries across the spectrum of scientific fields—and to improve both our understanding of the world and how we live in it.

Learn more about the promise of Exascale and the collaborative efforts of government, academia and industry to lead the way into this new era of computing.

Latest News and Information

Spack, a Lab-Developed 'App Store for Supercomputers,' Becoming Standard-Bearer

Spack, a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory-developed open source package manager optimized for high performance computing (HPC), is making waves throughout the HPC community, including internationally, as evidenced by a recent tour of European HPC facilities by the tool’s developers.

2019 ECP Annual Meeting to Highlight Technical Successes, Emphasize Collaboration and Integration

January 14–18, 2019, at the Royal Sonesta Houston Galleria, Houston, TX, the 2019 Exascale Computing Project (ECP) Annual Meeting will convene to highlight technical accomplishments that are being enabled by interactions and collaborations within the ECP community.

Converging and Consolidating Algorithmic and Technology Innovation in Dense Linear Algebra Software

Jakub Kurzak, a research assistant professor at the University of Tennessee’s Innovative Computing Laboratory, discusses the Software for Linear Algebra Targeting Exascale (SLATE) project on the Let's Talk Exascale podcast.

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